Stratfor: Those Who Are (and Are Not) Sheltered From the Panama Papers

Summary: Here is Stratfor’s analysis of the Panama Papers, the biggest revelations since Snowden’s in 2013. And what we have is probably just the “tip of the iceberg.”

Stratfor

Those Who Are (and Are Not) Sheltered From the Panama Papers

Stratfor, 8 April 2016

Summary

On April 3, the Panama Papers hit media outlets around the world, and the fallout was swift. A prime minister lost his job, and other global leaders are under mounting pressure to account for their actions. But the effects of the leaks are not evenly spread; the documents contained far more information about the offshore activities of individuals in the developing world than in the developed world. Whatever the reasons for the imbalance, it will likely limit the papers’ impact. In the developing world, long histories of corruption have dulled the public’s sensitivity to scandal, and repressive governments leave little room for popular backlash.

So although less information was released on Western leaders, it is already doing more damage. Iceland’s leader has left his post, and relatively minor revelations have had a disporportionately large impact in the United Kingdom and France. Meanwhile, in the developing world, the Panama Papers’ effects have been most strongly felt in the former Soviet Union, a region in which political tensions were already high. The leaks’ results have been more mixed in China, where they have provided new targets for the anti-corruption drive already underway but have also implicated figures close to the administration’s upper ranks.

This is only the beginning. The Panama Papers are the largest information dump of their kind, and the information that has been released so far appears to be just the tip of the iceberg. They are also the latest in a string of public leaks that seem to be happening more and more frequently. As revelations continue to surface, calls for greater global transparency will only get louder.

Stratfor’s analysis by region

  • Former Soviet Union
  • Europe
  • Latin America
  • Asia-Pacific
  • Middle East and North Africa
  • Sub-Saharan Africa
  • South Asia

See the full report at Stratfor.

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