Does Donald Trump have a perverted attraction to Ivanka?

Summary: Having failed to convince a majority of America that Donald Trump is Hitler, a racist fascist, they turn to a vile smear — that he has perverted fantasies about his daughter, Ivanka. It’s typical of them to prefer smears rather than dealing with the vital issues that Trump has raised. Here are their accusations and the evidence they cite. You decide.

Trump and Ivanka

The polls show a virtual tie between Clinton and Trump is perhaps explained by the Democrats’ odd reluctance to debate Trump on his positions (here and here), especially globalization, mass immigration, and our foreign wars. Instead they devise memes that only a leftist can love. Trump is a racist (like all who disagree with them). He’s Hitler (ditto). He aspires to be Putin. And now, a new low even for the Left, they say he has a perverted sexual attraction to his daughter, Ivanka.

These accusations play well on the Left (as similar smears do on the Right). But will they change any minds? Decades of indiscriminate overuse by the Left have eroded away their force. I hope this doesn’t become another chapter in my “why the Left loses” series (see them listed below).

Is Trump a pervert?

Daily Kos was at the forefront of this story with their Jan 17 article: “Forget About ‘Socialist’. ‘Creepy’ & ‘Elitist’ Are Much Tougher Labels To Overcome.” by “mstoner” — “So, let look at two labels you could apply to our most likely general election opponent; Donald ‘Creepy’ & ‘Elitist’ Trump.” It’s the usual Daily Kos mish-mash. Here’s the basis for the allegations that Trump is a pervert with incestuous fantasies. First, on “The View” (6 March 2006) Trump said…

“I don’t think Ivanka would do that {pose for Playboy}, although she does have a very nice figure. I’ve said if Ivanka weren’t my daughter, perhaps I’d be dating her.”

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Stratfor: China Is Building Its Future on Credit

Summary: China, like the US, has surprised the bears by the resilience of its economy. Here Strafor examines one source of its economic strength, one that might haunt its future — massive and imprudent accumulation of debt.

Stratfor

China Is Building Its Future on Credit
Stratfor, 20 July 2016

Summary

As China tries to overcome slowdowns in its industrial and trade sectors, the country’s banks have continued to increase the pace of lending, issuing 1.38 trillion yuan ($205.8 billion) worth of loans in June. The figure confirms some economists’ expectations that lending will keep rising as China’s central government attempts to revive economic growth and boost property markets that showed signs of another slump in May. It also indicates that despite Beijing’s repeated pledges to reduce the economy’s reliance on credit and state-led investment, the easy flow of financing from state-owned banks remains the country’s primary bulwark against widespread debt crises among corporations and local governments.

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ECRI explains the global slowdown, and what lies ahead

Summary: The Economic Cycle Research Institute (ECRI), who correctly predicted the slow recovery, looks at the multi-year slowing in the economies of the developed nations — its causes (the world is becoming Japan) and likely consequences.

The Business Cycle

ECRI’s Simple Math Goes Global

ECRI, 20 June 2016.
Reposted with their generous permission.

The risk of a global recession is edging up, as the global slowdown we first noted last fall continues (ICO Essentials, September 2015). This danger is heightened because longer-term trend growth is slowing in every Group of Seven (G7) economy, as dictated by simple math: growth in output per hour, i.e., labor productivity – plus growth in the potential labor force – a proxy for hours worked – adding up to real GDP growth.

As we laid out over a year ago (USCO Essentials, June 2015), this simple combination of productivity and demographic trends reveals that U.S. trend GDP growth is converging toward 1%. This is reminiscent of Japan during its “lost decades,” where average annual real GDP growth  registered just ¾%,  which is why we have cautioned that the U.S. is “becoming Japan” (USCO Essentials, February 2016) and (ICO, July 2013).

Expanding this analysis to the rest of the G7, we find that every economy is effectively becoming Japan, and the sharpest slowdowns are happening outside North America. Thus, as trend growth falls in the world’s largest advanced economies amid the ongoing global slowdown, the threat of a global recession is growing.

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