Author Archives: Chet

How much longer for the “long war”? Who will win?

Summary:  In this first of a multi-author series about the next decade of our long war, Chet Richards gives some provocative answers about its next phase. The long war is the key geopolitical issue for America. It will affect our affairs, both domestic and foreign. Post your thoughts in the comments.  {1st of 2 posts today.}

Seeing the future

Ron Chapple/Getty Images

What is the future of the “long war”? Here are a few guesses for the next 10 years. By “long war,” I mean our attempt to eliminate large-scale political violence by non-state groups, originating in other countries but presumably directed at us, if not now then sometime in the future.  Just call it the “LW.”  So here goes:

My big guess: Our attempts to eliminate international political violence will be as successful as any other attempt to eliminate such violence since 1945 or so. (Shocking, I know) Groups come, groups go.

Despite this, the LW will continue because it serves useful domestic political purposes. If we suddenly stopped funding those parts of our national security apparatus (not just DoD) that do not contribute to the defense of the United States, I estimate that we would cut roughly 3/4 of a trillion dollars per year from the inertia provided by the federal budget.  Cost, in other words, is not a deterrent to the LW but a strong reason to continue it. At least for a while.

In the meantime, the Darwinian ratchet will continue to operate, producing ever more capable non-state groups in the Middle East, South Asia, and Central America.  My guess: After a sorting out process, new states will form in these areas.

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Advice from Sun Tzu and John Boyd on winning at cyberwar

Summary: While we’re enmeshed in 4th generation wars we don’t know how to fight, (let alone win) a new form of conflict arrives. Least we repeat our feckless habit of fighting then thinking, let’s develop strategies before serious clashes begin. Chet Richards helps us decide if the military classics can help us, or has new tech made them obsolete?  {2nd of 2 posts today.}

“Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win.”
— Sun Tzu in The Art of War.

 

Chet Richards comments on

InfoSec, Sun Tzu & the Art of Whore
by Steve Tornio and Brian Martin.
Posted At Attrition, 2 July 2010.

.
The authors did a great job. I found nothing to argue with in their article. But they appear to have underestimated the power of Sun Tzu’s advice, even in the unique realm of cyberwar.

I can’t argue with their observation that if you try to follow the specific prescriptions of of The Art of War,  you’re either going to be playing with analogies or you must find an opponent willing to act like a Chinese army of the Warring States Period (475-221 BC).

However, when viewed from another perspective it’s possible to see beyond the specifics of long-ago technology for deeper insights. These insights are rooted in human nature and so may prove as useful to cyber war as to any form of conflict.

Their criticism, for example, of how people tend to apply Master Sun’s advice also applies to the works of the late John Boyd (Colonel, USAF), whose major briefing, Patterns of Conflict, appears to be all about war, and mostly about the German Blitzkrieg. But to find deeper meanings, let’s start with what Boyd said about Sun Tzu’s Art of War, on Patterns of Conflict chart 13. First, he talks about some of the “themes” he finds in the work:
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Are we at war with ISIS? Does it make a difference what you call it?

Summary:  Today Chet Richards (Colonel, USAF, retired) looks at our conflict with the Islamic State. What kind of conflict is this? What is the nature of our foe? Victory becomes a matter of luck without answers to these questions.  {2nd of 2 posts today}.

What's in a name?


Does it make any difference what you call it? Yes, because what you call it affects how you think about it. Here’s just one example, from John Basil Utley’ “12 Reasons America Doesn’t Win Its Wars” in The American Conservative: “During wartime who dares question almost any Pentagon cost ‘to defend America’?”

Sun Tzu suggested, in the opening lines of The Art of War, that “War is a matter of vital importance to the state, the province of life or death; the road to survival or ruin.” (Griffith trans., p. 63.)

It follows, then, that if what you’re looking at isn’t a matter of survival of the state, it isn’t war. Can you, with a straight face, claim that the United States is engaged with an existential enemy outside of its own borders? 

So if it isn’t war, how should we deal with it? Well, let’s look at what one of our opponents is doing (one can have “opponents” in many fields other than war). The title of this article from today’s New York Times pretty much tells the story: “Offering Services, ISIS Ensconces Itself in Seized Territories.”

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