Catalonia breaks Spain, the next step to a new Europe

Summary: Former UK ambassador Craig Murray looks at Catalonia and sees that everything is changing, just as they are in America. The tribes of Left and Right are reforming as their allegiances shift. Nations are fragmenting. The major news media conceal or lie as needed to protect the narrative.

“The world is changed, I can feel it in the water, I can feel it in the earth, I can smell it in the air.”
— Said by Treebeard, leader of the Ents, in The Two Towers — part II of Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings saga.

Catalonia map on a vintage Catalonia flag background.
Catalonia map on a vintage Catalonia flag background. ID 95577374 © Ruletkka | Dreamstime.

Democratic Triumph for Catalan Separatists

By Craig Murray at his website, 29 April 2019.
Posted with his generous permission.

The Spanish General election in Catalonia was a stunning victory for the Catalan Separatists, their best ever election result, achieved despite their leadership being exiled or political prisoners and despite an avalanche of MSM propaganda against them. Four of those elected are currently in jail. The Spanish state has reacted by declaring the two major separatist candidates, Clara Ponsati and Carles Puigdemont, ineligible for the European Parliament elections.

The Catalan Republican Left won the biggest share of the vote, which negates the continued false propaganda being put about Catalonian Independence being a right wing movement. Over 60% of the vote in Catalonia went to avowedly left wing parties.

It is further worth noting that there is a very plain correlation between the geographical location of the 3.6% of the vote that the neo-fascists of Vox gained in Catalonia, and the Spanish occupation garrisons in the country. You will struggle very hard indeed to learn any of the above facts from British mainstream media; I had to get them all from Catalan sources.

Photo of the right wing anti-Catalan pin-up.

Inés Arrimadas
Inés Arrimadas. Spanish government photo (Pool Moncloa – Diego Crespo).

The Guardian has published 55 articles in the last three years boosting Inés Arrimadas, the leader of the Catalan branch of the right wing “Spanish” Citizens Party {Ciudadanos}, including at least three op-eds written by Ines herself. The Guardian has sought relentlessly to portray public opinion in Catalonia as anti-Independence, and Arrimadas as its true representative.

Yet in the Spanish General Election, Arrimadas’ party got only 11.6% of the vote in Catalonia. The right wing nationalist Spanish parties, the fascist Vox, the Francoist PP and Arrimadas’ foreign security service promoted Citizens, got a pathetic 20.1% of the vote between all three, in a stunning Catalan rejection of Spanish nationalism.

The Citizens Party started life as an astroturf effort to help counter the left-wing and anti-EU populism of Podemos. To that end it was funded and assisted by the German foreign intelligence service, the BND. It remains a favourite tool of foreign intelligence services, particularly MI6 which of course sees the links between Catalan and Scottish nationalism. Hence the peculiarly active link between Ciudadanos {the “Citizens” party} and MI6’s print media mouthpiece, the Guardian.

It is impossible to correlate directly from party results to potential referendum results, as a number of parties including Podemos and the Greens hold ambivalent positions on Independence, and a percentage of voters will have a view on Independence which differs from the party they support. For example a small but significant number of Socialist Party supporters of PM Pedro Sanchez, also support Catalan Independence.

Given the thuggish violence of Francoist paramilitary forces against the ordinary voters in Catalonia’s referendum, given the imprisoning and exile of its peaceful leadership, given the extraordinary Madrid dictated barrage of MSM propaganda, the Catalan nationalist victory in the General Election is a wonderful triumph for the human spirit. Now you won’t hear that in the MSM.

Eye with a Catalonian flag in it.
ID 97166528 © Ruletkka | Dreamstime.

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Editor’s note

Large states are cracking under the pressures of modernity. The absence of conventional war among developed nations also eliminates the need to belong to a large state (starting wars has not worked since 1648). Internally, the political coalitions that have ruled the developed nations since WWII are breaking up. This is not the decline of the nation-state. They are just breaking into smaller, more cohesive units.

The result is chaos (e.g., The Guardian acting as the mouthpiece of the British security services). It disrupts the neat narratives that journalists, Left and Right, have used for decades – so they ignore it. To learn about the action, look to fringe sources.

Murray’s post demonstrates that we must Prepare for the coming changes. Changes in everything.

Craig Murray

About the author

Craig Murray is an author, broadcaster and human rights activist. He joined the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office in 1984. His career culminated as British Ambassador to Uzbekistan 2002 to 2004. It ended when he criticized regime as repressive and using torture (both the American and British governments freaked out). Afterwards he was Rector of the University of Dundee from 2007 to 2010. In 2016 the US government refused to allow him entry to the US.

See his articles at his websiteSee his bio. See his Wikipedia entry – he has led an extraordinary life.

One of Murray’s book is Sikunder Burnes: Master of the Great Game. From the publisher…

“This is an astonishing true tale of espionage, journeys in disguise, secret messages, double agents, assassinations and sexual intrigue. Alexander Burnes was one of the most accomplished spies Britain ever produced and the main antagonist of the Great Game as Britain strove with Russia for control of Central Asia and the routes to the Raj.”

For More Information

Ideas! For some shopping ideas, see my recommended books and films at Amazon.

See Giles Tremlett’s article about Catalonia in the London Review of Books.

If you liked this post, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. See all posts by Craig Murray, about Spain, and especially these…

  1. Stratfor: European unification – they’ll live unhappily ever after.
  2. Strange perspectives on the challenges facing Europe.
  3. Europe is too tired to fight, perhaps too tired to live.
  4. Conversions to Islam will reshape the West.
  5. About Europe’s historic experiment with open borders.

Books about Catalonia

The Struggle for Catalonia: Rebel Politics in Spain by Raphael Minder (2017).

The classic: Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell (1938; see Wikipedia).

The Struggle for Catalonia: Rebel Politics in Spain
Available at Amazon.
Homage to Catalonia
Available at Amazon.

26 thoughts on “Catalonia breaks Spain, the next step to a new Europe”

  1. You mention that “The Guardian has sought relentlessly to portray public opinion in Catalonia as anti-Independence”, to then mention that Spanish nationalist parties “got a pathetic 20.1% of the vote”. Apparently your propaganda forgets that PSOE, equally anti-independence party, got 23.21% of the vote, and Podemos, also anti-independence although pro-referendum, got another 14.89% of the vote. Hence, anti-independence parties got 58.1% of the vote. As for now, never ever pro-independence parties got more than 50% of the vote.

  2. A few quibbles with Murry “spanish occupation garrisons” , the catalan region has been part of the kingdom of spain since the 14th century, it was a union of two crowns, with aragon being the arguably senior party in the beginning. This formulation makes as little sense as the British occupation of Scotland, or Northern Ireland. Murry is a passionate supporter of both Catalan and Scottish independence, this colors his views on both the spanish and british governments. That said I read his blog and find it a useful corrective to the newspapers, like as he says the Guardian, which I agree has become a tool of British and American security services (see luke harding).

    “Large states are cracking under the pressures of modernity”

    I would argue it is the pressures of Postmodernity that are acting on existing stress lines in composite states, like Britain and Spain. Other states like France, Germany, Italy seem to be fine.
    The current surge for independence in Catalan was really helped by the spanish government sponsored setting up of Catalan language radio, schools, TV stations, after years of fascist oppression. Those quickly became a parallel cultural space, secured by activists they began pumping out pro catalan propaganda. Most people now in catalonia only listen to catalan voices, pro spanish voices marginalised. This is identity politics writ large, but it began with a misguided post modern attempt at inclusivity. Even during the spanish civil war the most catalans wanted to restore the spanish republic, not independence.
    The current Catalan independence movement is a Post Modern phenomenon, it has no real parallels in spanish history. There have been revolts before, mostly due to taxation, and the centralising demands of interstate war, ie hard issues. This is a revolt that is fundamentally cultural.
    I would argue that the identity politics that seem to be affecting the west in general, are exacerbating the differences between regions in Spain and to a lesser extent in scotland. In essence my view is the centralising and homogenising impulses of Modernity are being undone by the many interpretations of narrative that Postmodernism brings, how can a unitary state survive when the story it tells itself can be constantly, endlessly deconstructed.

    I see a parallel in the antifa left in America, whos slogan is America was never great, that Americas origin stories are not only wrong, but that america itself is evil, because of its difficult beginning. This wouldn’t be so bad, a useful corrective to smugness and something you could argue against, but they can’t even agree on an alternative, there narrative is constantly fragmenting, native american history, feminist history, black history, ect. It’s like fighting a hydra. This is the Postmodern condition.

    I hope one day we will be able to fuse the best of Modernism with the best of Postmodernity, there is no one truth, no completely agreed narrative, but there must rules to how we interpret the past, the present, an agreed way of conducting a conversation, otherwise like the spanish and catalans, msm and fox, we will retreat to our bubbles, there to turn on ourselves.

    Sorry to go on, but its something thats been on my mind.

    1. Gerard,

      “the catalan region has been part of the kingdom of spain since the 14th century”

      Those people are dead. The people living today in Catalonia may have different views. Also, until the 19th century european states allowed a high degree of regional autonomy – esp cultural. For example, France is considered a highly centralized State. But French as a language replace regional versions only in the 19th century.

      “Other states like France, Germany, Italy seem to be fine.”

      Italy is also experiencing centripetal forces, between north and south. As is Belgium.

      1. My issue was with Craig Murrys characterization of “occupying garrisons” this isn’t Vichy France.

        That degree of autonomy declined with the growth of the state, in France the centralizing power of the state trumped over the regions, in Spain it was a partial failure, and meant that Castile bore the the greater part of the burdens of empire, and was the main reason why Spain faded as a great power. This lead to a resentment of the Catalans that is still apparent today. France and England crushed or co-oped there regions.
        I’ve traveled around Spain, and its regions really do have much stronger identities than say France or Germany, even to this day the failures of that centralizing project echo.
        This fantastic book details this process, if you ever get the chance to read it please do, its a great read
        https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1976742.The_Count_Duke_of_Olivares

        What is interesting about Italy, is that the Northern league, which was the main separatist movement has become the League, and has dropped the separatist agenda. It has also become the most popular party in Italy, it is anti immigrant, nationalistic, populist, and is powerful in both the north and south.
        Here is a good over view from bloomberg
        https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2019-04-05/don-t-be-fooled-by-the-salvini-show-this-populist-has-a-plan

        Belgium is a strange case, created after the Napoleonic to constrain French power, it is as artificial in it construction as the Central African Republic, its amazing that its lasted as long as it has when the reason for its creation has long since vanished. It is atypical in a European context.
        My feeling is it will last as long as the European Union lasts.

      2. Gerard,

        “My issue was with Craig Murrys characterization of “occupying garrisons” this isn’t Vichy France.”

        It’s nice that you don’t feel that way. But history shows that people have a low tolerance for armed presence of “others” on “their” land. These concepts change, sometimes quickly. In 1763, British troops in the American colonies were protectors – “us.” In 1770, the Boston Massacre, they were armed foreign occupiers.

        Things change.

  3. Francisco Miguez Vaca

    Come on Craig! You better get real, get a life, and get lost.! Oh!, and don’t forget to add some “fun” between your buttocks in the process, to round it all up! Your article clearly shows the sort of misinformation and cheap propaganda of which Dr. Goebbels himself would be proud of. It’s simply an insult for those who actually live in Catalonia and have to put up everyday with those who think they are a cut above the rest. This sort of rubbish as your article clearly is, is simply sickening in the extreme

    1. Francisco,

      Thank you for sharing your feelings. But this is not fifth grade Show And Tell, where the kids and teacher applaud sharing your feelings.

      Please tell us specifically what he said that was wrong. Supporting info or links would also be nice.

  4. Or you could look at Basque country, another autonomous region in Spain, and the downfall of the ETA.
    Separatism will always attract followers, but the majority both there and in Barcelona and elsewhere in Spain prefer the autonomy the have rather than independence.
    The EU and the Euro were doomed ever since they came into existence, if you listen to some people.
    All their forecasts have failed.
    And so will this one.
    The Guardian?? Who cares.

    1. priffe,

      “Or you could look at Basque country, another autonomous region in Spain, and the downfall of the ETA.”

      You must be kidding. The ETA were terrorists. Terrorists usually have low levels of popular support.

      “The EU and the Euro were doomed ever since they came into existence, if you listen to some people.”

      I have not seen many expert predictions of the EU’s “doom.” Predictions of the Euro’s effects have proven quite correct (see descriptions here). The EMU barely survived its first recession. Not a good sign for the future.

      “All their forecasts have failed.”

      Have you read them “all”? Or are you just blowing smoke?

      “And so will this one.”

      Do you often have delusions of godhood?

      “The Guardian?? Who cares.”

      People pay attention to the views of major media outlets because they are influential and, more important, reflect the views of powerful interest groups.

  5. Fabius,

    Most of the large European states: UK, Germany, Italy, Spain, France are made up of smaller ethnical groups more or less glued together and who spoke their own languages until recently. People living in smaller states, like I do, can understand this very well. From the Iberian perspective, Catalonia and Portugal are very similar (own language, strong ethnic identity, history of being a relatively powerful nation), but due to historical contingencies, one managed to break free from the Spanish kingdom in the XVIIth century and the other didn’t.

    Historically, these diverse states were kept together because of centralized pressures to adopt the common culture, especially language. These pressures were very authoritarian: in the XXth century the Catalonian, Basque and Galician languages were forbidden by the Spanish dictatorship, the French forbade speaking Breton in school, Italians forcibly changed the names of german minorities and declared languages such as Napolitan to be a dialect of Italian instead of a proper language. The success of this varied according to state, so you can say that the French were much more successful than the Spanish in eradicating ethnic subcultures.

    These independentist movements have been active throughout the centuries, with more or less success. But in the last decades it s not possible to make this kind of cultural oppression anymore, and now you add identity politics and the EU being a protective umbrella for small countries, and I think pro-immigration policies might also play a role (as an aggression from the central state to these regions). I think that in this environment it is natural that independentist movements get more support, and they’ll be stronger where cultural and ethnic suppression was less successful. So, while Spanish Catalonians and Basques have independentist views, French Catalonians and Basques are relatively quiet.

    So, my point is that the potential breaking up of Spain is something we could expect from their history and their incomplete success in eradicating ethnic subgroups, and that the environment is appropriate for this to repeat itself in other large European countries with similar compositions. It is not a new trend; in the past, the weakest states already broke (Jugoslavia, Austria) or were forced to let one of their components go (UK vs Ireland, Denmark vs Iceland). I would say that the next weak countries in the list are Spain and Italy, and that the UK will also get pressure after leaving the EU. I would only bet on Germany and France to survive these pressures.

    Belgium is a different animal, since it is an artificial combination of two communities with little in common, starting with very different languages. I think in Europe we’re surprised that Belgium has lasted as long as it did; cross the country by train and the fault lines are obvious even for foreigners. The Czechs and Slovaks had more in common between them and still got divorced as soon as they could. Nobody I know is betting on Belgium to last.

    1. JP,

      “Historically, these diverse states were kept together because of centralized pressures to adopt the common culture, especially language.”

      That’s not really correct. Smaller states were either conquered or willingly joined to avoid being conquered. After 4 centuries of lessons (aggressive war doesn’t work among developed western states), that fear is gone. Hence the long amalgamation of peoples is shifting into reverse.

      Also powering this is central states’ increasingly intrusive social engineering – in addition to the long-standing cultural assimilation (that you note). A last straw.

      1. Fabius,

        “Also powering this is central states’ increasingly intrusive social engineering – in addition to the long-standing cultural assimilation (that you note). A last straw.”

        I would agree with this in France, Germany and the UK, with issues such as open borders or European integration. But in Spain you have intrusive social engineering being done mostly by the autonomous Catalan state. E.g. the attempt to ban a large part of children’s story books from schools in Barcelona because they are sexist is being promoted by the regional authorities: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/apr/18/barcelona-school-removes-200-sexist-childrens-books.

        The Spanish state is, at most, associated with trying to limit some excesses of the Catalan autonomous government, which I would say also explains the success of Ciudadanos with right-wing Catalonians; their leader often speaks about this. But this is a case where independentist parties have held power for more than a decade. It’s not very easy to generalize the European situation.

      2. JP,

        You example is a story in The Guardian (as Murray notes, a partisan source) about action in one school.

        This is the kind of fun clickbait seen on slow news days in the US, finding something done in one (or a few schools) and running a pearl clutching story.

  6. Fabius,

    This is an example from the Guardian because it’s the only English version I found to share with your readers. I get my news in Portuguese, Spanish or Catalan, where this story was widely covered and has sparked a debate on whether it should be implemented elsewhere. I assumed most people wouldn’t understand these languages, though.

    My point was to provide you with an example of a trend which worries us, as natives of this corner of Europe, being promoted by the independentist autonomous government and not (as you claimed) by the central Spanish state. My larger point was that, in this case, you shouldn’t blame the centralized governments for the ongoing social experiments. But I do realize that most of your readers don’t care about details of Iberian politics, so I keep things short. Just don’t assume that we wait for the Guardian to tell us what’s happening here ;-)

    1. JP,

      “My point was to provide you with an example of a trend which worries us”

      That word does not mean what you think it does. A story about one school doing something does not describe a “trend.” Clickbait stories exist to get people excited, as this appears to have excited you.

      “My larger point was that, in this case, you shouldn’t blame the centralized governments for the ongoing social experiments.”

      False. I was referring to the two-century long policy of Europe’s central states to quash regional language and culture. The current “trend” – in an early stage – is by local governments to recover their language and culture, and central State’s efforts to stop this (i.e., continue their ongoing social experiment at constructing a national culture).

      1. False. I was referring to the two-century long policy of Europe’s central states to quash regional language and culture. The current “trend” – in an early stage – is by local governments to recover their language and culture, and central State’s efforts to stop this (i.e., continue their ongoing social experiment at constructing a national culture).

        Sorry to butt in on this, but didnt the central government devolve power to the regions after the Franco era precisely to give a voice and political power back to the basques, catalans et al? Its not an ongoing experiment at constructing a national culture, its an attempt to stop a longstanding state from splitting apart.

        My feeling Fabius is you are not well informed on this and are treating this poster unfairly after he raised some valid points. Sometimes it’s better to listen and have a dialogue rather to try to win by scoring points.

      2. Gerard,

        “is you are not well informed on this and are treating this poster unfairly after he raised some valid points”

        I often get this. People make bold confident statements without a shred of evidence. I post hard data. People say the exciting bold statements seem valid although wholly unsupported. Well, OK then.

        “its an attempt to stop a longstanding state from splitting apart.”

        Two sides of the same coin. The experiment has been running for a long time. Now, for reasons mentioned in this post, the process is beginning to reverse. Europe’s states are fighting to prevent that. See the subject of this post.

        The Catalan independence referendum was held on 1 October 2017: 92% voted yes, despite strong efforts by the Spanish national security services to stop it.

        The Catalan declaration of independence was passed by the Parliament of Catalonia on 27 October 2017, which declared the independence of Catalonia from Spain and the founding of an independent Catalan Republic.

        The Spanish government arrested leaders of the independence movement and imposed direct rule on Catalonia. A social experiment is identified by the use of police powers to force its operation. Details here.

        As for that logic you find so compelling, let’s look at it again: “you shouldn’t blame the centralized governments for the ongoing social experiments.” Who should you blame? People want their language, their culture, and self-government. Others use force to prevent this. Which side is “experimenting”?

        This is not a theoretical question. The Left in the US has big goals for remolding our society, and is not shy about using the government’s police powers to do so. If they gain sufficient power to try, there will be resistance.

      3. I’m sorry, english is not my native language. As for the rest, I’ll support what Gerard has said. It’s complicated to discuss with a non-native about this, because I am assuming you have a background you do not, and it’s difficult to assess what is common knowledge in the US.

        It is common knowledge, for me, that regional autonomies in Spain are a recent phenomena, starting in the 1980s after the end of the dictatorship. For example, in Catalonia, the Catalan language has experienced a clear recent revival promoted by the autonomous government, as explained here (sorry for the Catalan graph): http://www.gencat.cat/llengua/noves/noves/hm09hivern/a_sorolla2_8.htm. I would also say this is common knowledge in Europe, so I apologize if I didn’t explain it.

        About the desire of Catalans for independence, you might want to check last sunday’s vote in Spain, where independentists (ERC + JxCat) won about half of the vote in Catalonia. Far from the 93% in the referendum, which as Gerard said was not representative. I only have it in Spanish but it should be easy to understand: https://resultados.elpais.com/elecciones/2019/generales/congreso/09/

        I won’t discuss this anymore, since I prefer calm arguments. Your website is one with the most rational argumentation in the comments, which is why I follow it. Keep up the excellent work.

      4. JP,

        “regional autonomies in Spain are a recent phenomena”

        Yes, that’s what I said.

        “in Catalonia, the Catalan language has experienced a clear recent revival promoted by the autonomous government”

        Yes, that is what I said.

        “Far from the 93% in the referendum, which as Gerard said was not representative”

        I assume you are kidding us. Gerard doesn’t know better, but you know of the massive interference by the security services before the election (as described in the article I cited). So the election was not representative, but in the opposite of the sense you imply.

        “where independentists (ERC + JxCat) won about half of the vote in Catalonia.”

        Including the four thrown in jail, and the reverberations from imposition of direct rule. So yes, use of the State’s police powers has slowed growth of support for independence (up from 15 in 2016 to 22 seats). I believe most people would consider that a sign of the national government’s weakening legitimacy in Catalonia.

  7. Ok I’ll bite, the independence referendum was illegal, only the people who wanted independence voted. Come on really, 92%… on a 43% turnout, do the maths.

    Taken from Wikipedia
    “The referendum was approved by the Catalan parliament in a session on 6 September 2017 along with the Law of juridical transition and foundation of the Republic of Catalonia the following day 7 of September, which stated that independence would be binding with a simple majority, without requiring a minimum turnout.[17][18] After being suspended, the law was finally declared void on 17 October,[19] being also illegal according to the Statute of Autonomy of Catalonia which requires a two third majority, 90 seats, in the Catalan parliament for any change to Catalonia’s status.[20][21][22]”

    It speaks for itself. That was not democracy, it was an attempt to ram it through. The Spanish government has to represent the 50% of Spanish citizens in Catalonia who are happy with things as they are, a high degree of autonomy, there own culture, language, ect, and citizens of Spain.

    I’m not defending the spanish government actions, they lost their heads, its obvious. They have made terrible mistakes, but I have sympathy for them, Catalonia leaving Spain would be like the US losing the North eastern States and half of California.
    I’m not opposed to any regions independence, but it has to be done right, slowly, carefully, with consent, with empathy. The independence referendum in Scotland is how you do it right, what happened in Catalonia is a massive failure of politics.

    “As for that logic you find so compelling, let’s look at it again: “you shouldn’t blame the centralized governments for the ongoing social experiments.”

    I believe this was JP’s post, I think you erroneously attributed that to me, I’ll let him answer.

    1. “This is not a theoretical question. The Left in the US has big goals for remolding our society, and is not shy about using the government’s police powers to do so. If they gain sufficient power to try, there will be resistance.”

      Along what lines do you see that happening, this is happening now, the government is always using force to remake society just look at the drug war and the mass incarceration of black and the poor, if that isn’t remaking society, I don’t know what is.

    2. Gerard,

      I suggest you read the entry. You appear to have missed most of the important parts about the referendum. Esp interesting because I mentioned that aspect in my comment.

  8. I am well aware of the voter suppression, that does not alter the fact that 92% of the cast vote was yes, this indicates a huge segment of the population did not consider the vote even legitimate, I’m not sure why you won’t acknowledge that.

    I agree with your view that states are under stress, but cannot go along with Craig Murrys one eyed view on the issue

    This in any event is not very productive discussion, will leave it here. Longtime reader and always appreciate your feed back and the time you take to reply to posts.

  9. As mentioned in the comments below, this article seems to purposefully hide information from the reader in order to present only one side of the story. PSOE is clearly in favor of Spanish unity and got close to a million votes, very similar to the result from ERC. Overall more people voted for pro-unity parties. The “villanous” Citizens party has the most seats in the Catalan parliament currently. Writing things like “violence of Francoist paramilitary forces against the ordinary voters” shows a clear bias. But I guess this is an opinion article and not news.

    1. Andreu,

      What makes the people of the West such a joy to their rulers is the eagerness with which they lap up one-sided propaganda from their rulers. See the Big List of Lies by US Leaders. But we always believe the next one.

      But what makes us an extraordinary gift to our rulers is the hostile response to those who show alternative viewpoints.

      “this article seems to purposefully hide information from the reader in order to present only one side of the story. ”

      We’ve written 4613 posts. While we try to show both sides, that’s not practical. Readership drops fast after 500 words, and really fast after 100 words. Just stating one side in that space is difficult. So we focus on showing what the news does not say, assuming readers already know the standard story.

      So what you mean is that this isn’t a super long article that most won’t read, telling the side of the story already covered in the major media. In other words, you want to the article to say what you want to say.

      For fun, why don’t you write some articles about complex controversial issues, and let others critique to see if they fully cover all sides of the issue. Don’t make them too long or boring!

      “Overall more people voted for pro-unity parties.”

      Given the Spanish government’s punitive response to the referendum, that is a rational response. Considering that a vote of confidence is quite mad. Keep those eyes closed! If you open them, who knows what you might see.

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