Reforming America: steps to new politics

How can we save the Second Republic (built on the Constitution)? Or if it’s too late for that, how can we build a Third Republic on our experiences — perhaps a better one? Here are links to posts giving specific help to those interested in joining this movement.

Don't Blame. Grow

Contents

  1. How to reform American politics
  2. Other pages with posts about American politics
  3. Large issues in the reform of America
  4. A less gullible America, when we see our world more clearly
  5. Building an organization
  6. Operational issues
  7. About protests
  8. Inspirational posts about reforming America
  9. Other posts about reforming America
  10. Using art as a tool to revitalize America
  11. Using anger as a tool to revitalize America
  12. Reforming the Constitution: futile or dangerous?
  13. Comments from readers

(1) How to reform American politics

For every article proposing ways to make radical changes in America’s political system, there are a thousand articles describing our problems. It’s become entertainment, like baseball. Cheer our team! Thrill at tales of the bad guys’ dastardly deeds! More fun to read than discussing the years of difficult work needed to reform America, or the technical details of political tactics.

The FM website takes a different approach, asking only that you get involved in the movement to reform America’s politics. Rather than ask you to share our values and goals, we ask you to work for yours. These posts will help you to do so.

I have faith that more citizen involvement will make a better and stronger America. I don’t ask you to share that faith. I ask you only to have faith in yourself, and to see yourself as crew of America — not its passengers. Here are two summaries of my recommendations:

  1. How you can start the campaign to reform America.
  2. New political leaders offer hope & change. They show us what we need for victory.
  3. What if Samuel Adams tried to start the Revolution by blogging? — Describing our situation; pointing to a way forward.
  4. Enough analysis! America is broken. Here are some ways to fix it.
  5. Can we organize the political reform of America? Our past shows how.
  6. The 1% are changing America. It’s our move.
  7. Important — A guide for journalists and reformers to politics in America: A picture of America, showing a path to political reform.

(2)  Reference pages linking other posts about American politics

  1. Posts about politics in America.
  2. How can we stop the quiet coup now in progress?
  3. Posts about seeing America clearly, in the mirror.

(3)  Large issues in the reform of America

  1. Five steps to fixing America — Things you can do as an individual.
  2. The project to reform America: a matter for science or a matter of will?
  3. Realism about the prospects for reform in America.
  4. Politics in modern America: A users’ guide for journalists and reformers.

(4)  A less gullible America, when we see our world more clearly

  1. Describing the problem: Politics in modern America: A users’ guide for journalists and reformers.
  2. The secret, simple tool that persuades Americans. That molds our opinions.
  3. We cannot agree on simple facts and so cannot reform America.
  4. American politics is a fun parade of lies, for which we pay dearly.
  5. Our minds are addled, the result of skillful and expensive propaganda.
  6. Important advice: Learning skepticism, an essential skill for citizenship in 21st century America. About “extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof”.
  7. We live in an age of ignorance, but can decide to fix this – today.
  8. Remembering is the first step to learning. Living in the now is ignorance.
  9. Swear allegiance to the truth as a step to reforming America.
  10. Ways to deal with those guilty of causing the fake news epidemic.
  11. A new year’s gift: two tools to help discover truth in the news.

(5) Building an organization

  1. A third try: The First Step to reforming America — Organizing.
  2. The sure route to reforming America — Organizing.
  3. We’re at the very early days of organizing. Have realistic expectations.
  4. Some basics about political organizing in the 21st century. — Building a big organization.
  5. How to recruit people to the cause of reforming America.
  6. How can we arouse a passion to reform America in the hearts of our neighbors?
  7. Is grassroots organizing a snare or magic bullet for the reform of America?
  8. What if the Founders’ generation read the news as we do?
  9. Samuel Adams started the Revolution because he didn’t have Twitter.

(6)  Operational issues in the project to reform America

  1.  The bad news about reforming America: time is our enemy.
  2. Why the 1% is winning, and we are not.
  3. We are alone in the defense of the Republic.
  4. Who can we trust to defend our liberty? Will our culture’s rot spread to the military?

(7) About protests

  1. How to stage effective protests in the 21st century.
  2. Occupy Wall Street, another futile peasants’ protest.
  3. Lessons from the failure of Occupy Wall Street, its lasting legacy.
  4. Occupy & Tea Party are alike, both saving America through cosplay.
  5. How do protests like the TP and OWS differ from effective political action?
  6. The Million Vet March, a typical peasants’ protest. Does it portend more serious protests in our future?
  7. Martin Luther King Jr’s advice to us about using violence to reform America.
  8. The protesters at Ferguson might have won, but choose to lose.
  9. Will the Ferguson protest force development of African-American leaders?
  10. Why America has militarized its police and crushes protests.
  11. The protests in NYC repeat those in Ferguson, and probably will end the same – as wins for the 1%.
  12. Why don’t political protests work? What are the larger lessons from our repeated failures?
  13. Thoreau reminds us about one of the few tools we have to control the government — About civil disobedience.
  14. About this new era of protests by the Left.

(8)  Inspirational posts about reforming America

  1. Can we reignite the spirit of America?
  2. Should we despair, giving up on America?
  3. Is this the dawn of a new age? Two journalists see the first step to reforming America.
  4. Pirate Bay points the way to a new political reform movement.
  5. Lessons from the New Eden galaxy about reforming America.
  6. We watch “The Winter Soldier”, then see similar actions in our news. Can it inspire us to act?
  7. Enough analysis! America is broken. Here are some ways to fix it.
  8. Can we organize the political reform of America? Our past shows how.

(9)  Other posts about reforming America

  1. Understand our problem before you prescribe a cure for America. We’ve gone mad.
  2. In “Network”, Howard Beale asks us to get mad and do something. He’s still waiting.
  3. The missing but essential key to building a better America — Clear sight about our condition.
  4. Attention Americans: the Revolution has begun. You must choose a side.
  5. America slides to the right, faster. Why? What you can do about it!
  6. Enough analysis! America is broken. Here are some ways to fix it.
  7. Can we organize the political reform of America? Our past shows how.
  8. Politics in modern America: A users’ guide for journalists and reformers.
  9. Becoming better informed won’t help. Here’s a small easy step towards political change.

(10) Using art as a tool to revitalize America

  1. A great artist died today. We can gain inspiration from his words. — About the Man in the Mirror.
  2. The New America needs a new national anthem! Here’s my nomination.
  3. Music to accompany a Revolution.
  4. Listen to hear the state of America (and its cure) explained in song.
  5. The third step to reforming America, with music.
  6. Writing a good slogan is a key to reforming America — “Set fire to the rain”.
  7. Forgotten what political reform looks like? See this reminder by Taylor Swift.

(11)  Using anger as a tool to revitalize America

  1. Now is the time for America to get angry.
  2. Re-envisioning the FM website, becoming soldiers in the war for American’s future.
  3. Vital reading for America: two stories that might help arouse us to action.
  4. The Idiocies of “Oversight” and “Accountability”.
  5. In “Network”, Howard Beale asks us to get mad and do something. He’s still waiting.
  6. A simple thing you can do to start the reform of America: get angry.
  7. How can we arouse a passion to reform America in the hearts of our neighbors?
  8. Should we risk using anger to arouse America?
  9. Amnesia and anger: one is the problem, the other the cure.
  10. The best response to Campaign 2016: anger.

(12)  Reforming the Constitution: futile or dangerous?

  1. Is it time to take the drastic step of calling a Constitutional Convention?
  2. Could a new Constitutional Convention help reform America? Is it worth the risk?
  3. Can Constitutional amendments save the Republic?

(13)  Comments from readers: many voices urging surrender

  1. About taking responsibility, the first step — Everything starts with this.
  2. About our choices are elections, revolt, or passivity.
Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Reforming America: steps to new politics

  1. s e (@oldgulph)

    The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee the presidency, to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in the country.

    Every vote, everywhere, would be politically relevant and equal in presidential elections. No more distorting and divisive red and blue state maps of pre-determined outcomes. There would no longer be a handful of ‘battleground’ states where voters and policies are more important than those of the voters in 80% of the states that now are just ‘spectators’ and ignored after the conventions.

    The bill would take effect when enacted by states with a majority of Electoral College votes—that is, enough to elect a President (270 of 538). The candidate receiving the most popular votes from all 50 states (and DC) would get all the 270+ electoral votes of the enacting states.

    The bill has passed 33 state legislative chambers in 22 rural, small, medium, large, red, blue, and purple states with 250 electoral votes. The bill has been enacted by 11 jurisdictions with 165 electoral votes – 61% of the 270 necessary to go into effect.

    NationalPopularVote.com

    Like

    Reply
    1. Editor of the Fabius Maximus website Post author

      se,

      Why not just hope for magic beans? We don’t have any organization capable of passing such a bill. The missing element is not nifty ideas about cures, but organizing people for the long trek to political reform. Perhaps at some point down the road such massive changes might be necessary.

      On the other hand, I wonder if a nation capable of passing such a bill might not need it. That’s not to say it’s not a good idea, or that it wouldn’t help. But it’s part of winning, not a path to it. It lies in the post-victory phase — the pursuit phase. The phase we’re in now, as the 1% consolidates its power following decades of victories.

      Like

    2. s e (@oldgulph)

      Since its introduction in 2006, The National Popular Vote bill has been endorsed by organizations such as the League of Women Voters, Common Cause, FairVote, Sierra Club, NAACP, National Black Caucus of State Legislators, ACLU, the National Latino Congreso, Asian American Action Fund, DEMOS, National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, Public Citizen, U.S. PIRG, and the Brennan Center for Justice.

      National Popular Vote Inc. is a 501(c)(4) non-profit corporation whose specific purpose is to study, analyze and educate the public regarding its proposal to implement a nationwide popular election of the President of the United States.

      More than 2,110 state legislators (in 50 states) have sponsored and/or cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.

      The bill has passed 33 state legislative chambers in 22 rural, small, medium, large, Democratic, Republican and purple states with 250 electoral votes, including one house in Arkansas (6), Maine (4), Michigan (16), Nevada (6), New Mexico (5), North Carolina (15), and Oklahoma (7), and both houses in Colorado (9).

      The bill has been enacted by 11 jurisdictions with 165 electoral votes – 61% of the 270 necessary to go into effect.

      Like

  2. S. Keeling

    Hi. FYI, I just got here upon clicking a link on TechDirt. I’ve no idea what I’m about to see.

    However, based on what I see so far, shouldn’t your first act be to secede from the union? Take your ball and go home. Starve the beast. Save the world by refusing to play.

    Like

    Reply
    1. Editor of the Fabius Maximus website Post author

      Keeling,

      Is this spam? The FM website gets a thousand per day in the trap (after Akismet blocks the most obvious spam), and its sometimes difficult to tell what’s real.

      If not, can you explain? I don’t understand what you’re attempting to say.

      Like

  3. tqkwp

    Er. You think what I wrote is spam/UCE?

    How’s about I be charitable and assume I’m replying to a bot that just wants to try to prove I’m not a spambot before it posts my comment. There are better (and devoid of insult) ways of confirming unknown prospective posts. We await Webmind’s arrival to save us from the spam scourge (or you could learn to understand the net – it’s really all just bits).

    So, care to answer the question: “shouldn’t your first act be to secede from the union?”

    Have fun! It’s a moral imperative.

    Like

    Reply
    1. Editor of the Fabius Maximus website Post author

      Tqkwp,

      (1) Don’t take everything so personally. Your comment was cryptic, with no obvious relevance to this post, in the general form of spam (that’s not a criticism, spam is designed to look appropriate without having any visible relationship to the post).

      (2) “shouldn’t your first act be to secede from the union?”

      That doesn’t make sense on several levels. First a trivial point: “secede” is to withdraw formally from membership in a political union. Texas can secede. People can surrender their citizenship, switching to another nation. Second, why is this a relevant question to this post? Why should someone’s “first act” be to switch nationalities?

      (3) “It’s a moral imperative”

      Why? This is too cryptic. You need to give readers a bit more information so they can understand your message.

      Like

  4. tqkwp

    “Don’t take everything so personally.”

    I’ve always hated that expression. I’ve never had any idea how to do that.

    Me: “shouldn’t your first act be to secede from the union?”

    FM: “Why should someone’s “first act” be to switch nationalities?”

    Switch, no. Resign from, yes. Refuse to be party to a tyrant’s regime, yes. Refuse to support a tyrant’s regime, yes.

    Me: “It’s a moral imperative”
    FM: Why? This is too cryptic.

    “Have fun! It’s a moral imperative.” Don’t edit my words. Yes, as a living, breathing, only going to live once human being, to have fun is a moral imperative. Suck it up. :-)

    Like

    Reply
    1. Editor of the Fabius Maximus website Post author

      tqkwp,

      You’re still not making any sense. I’ll try once more.

      “Switch, no. Resign from, yes.”

      So you surrender your US citizenship and become stateless? Aside from the practical difficulties (passport?), you become a kind of parasite — benefiting from nations run by their people, while you refuse the responsibilities of citizenship. Have you done that? I suspect not.

      ‘Refuse to be party to a tyrant’s regime”
      The US is a “tyrant’s regime”? Dramatize much? That’s silly.

      “Don’t edit my words.”
      I reply to direct quotes to avoid confusion. Quoting is not editing.

      ‘to have fun is a moral imperative. Suck it up. :-)”

      Sounds like you’re a troll: “a person who starts arguments by posting inflammatory, extraneous, or off-topic messages.”

      Like

Leave a comment & share your thoughts...

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s