newspapers

Journalists reporting the end of journalism as a profession

Summary: Journalists often have been unsympathetic when reporting past waves of unemployment from automation. Now they have the opportunity to do first person reporting, as computers replace professionals. Like journalists.  This is another chapter in a series about the the robot revolution, soon to reshape our world. “The new reporter on the US media scene …

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Clay Shirky is brilliant and American – hence often delusionally flattering

America’s broken Observation-Orientation-Decision-Action loop (aka OODA loop; see Wikipedia for details) affects us all, distorting our ability to see even simple things.  It’s most clearly seen in experts writing about their own fields.  Today’s example is Clay Shirky, one of America’s top writers about the evolution of the news media.  See his Wikipedia entry and bio about his background …

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Must the old media die for the new media to flourish?

Summary:   The mainstream media is dying to a large extent of self-inflicted wounds.  Journalists instead blame a wide range of other factors, following our new national motto: “It’s not MY fault!” Here is a look at our changing news media by an expert.  It’s worth a look, as the media is a major force re-shaping America: “A New …

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A new news media emerges for our new world, unseen and unexpected

Summary:  One indicator of the massive changes sweeping America is the destruction of longtime solid business models.  This post discussed colleges; today we look at the news media.  Tons of ink have been spilled on this, but IMO ignoring some likely outcomes. . The major news media are on a treadmill. Loss of credibility shrinks their audience, …

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The future, always in motion and therefore difficult to see

The future is always difficult to see, but especially during those discontinuous events called revolutions.  As Clay Shirky explains in this look at “Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable” (13 March 2009).  He discusses journalism, but his lessons are applicable to the world of today — small and large. Elizabeth Eisenstein’s magisterial treatment of Gutenberg’s invention, …

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